RHEINBROT – My Choice for July bake with BBB

For July bake I had quite a few options but have chosen this recipe because of Riesling. Well, if you know me, you know that I cook with wine, I bake with wine, I bake with wine flour as well. Here was a perfect opportunity to try a new recipe and also use Riesling flour I have on hands. I based my dough on Cathy’s numbers, just added a little bit of wine flour. As usually, wine flour changes the crumb color and gives additional sourness to sourdough, as well as rich and complex taste. It’s particularly great grilled and eaten warm with butter.
Below is copy of Cathy’e recipe and my notes at the end.

Rheinbrot – A Taste of July with the BBB

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Rheinbrot is made with an overnight sponge of Reisling, sourdough, flour and water. This version includes spelt and emmer in the final dough.
Author: Bread Experience
Recipe type: Sourdough Loaf
Cuisine: Bread
Serves: 1 Medium Loaf
Ingredients
Sponge:
72 grams sweet Riesling (or other white wine of your choice)
72 grams boiled water, at room temperature
143 grams white bread flour
72 grams sourdough at 100% hydration
Dough:
207 grams white bread flour
95 grams whole grain spelt flour
55 grams whole grain emmer flour
190 – 225 grams water, divided
8 grams salt
Instructions
1. Mix wine with water and add the sourdough, whisk thoroughly. Add flour and mix again.
2. The dough ferments at 2 stages:
3 hours at a temperature 70-75°F, it should grow at least twice its size, will be lumpy looking at this stage and have larger and smaller bubbles.
3. Pour the sponge in a bowl and whisk thoroughly to remove all the gas out of it and fill it with oxygen. Cover and let sit for 10-12 hours (overnight) at room temperature. Dough will rise again in half and very often shows smaller bubbles.
4. Now the sponge is ready for kneading: pour in the water and stir until smooth. Add the flour, mix well and give the autolysis a chance to do it’s magic for 40-50 minutes. I added more water due to the whole grains, but depending on the type of flour used, you may not need additional water.
5. Add the salt and quickly knead the dough, if it is too sticky add a little four, but be careful not to add too much. You may also need to add a little bit of water to dissolve the salt.
6. Let ferment for 2-2.5 hours. Fold twice after 1 hour and 1½ hour.
7. Form a loaf and let proof in a basket for 1½ hours (until doubled in size) covered with a towel in a draft free place.
8. Preheat oven to 450°F with a baking stone on the middle rack.
9. Gently flip the loaf over to a piece of parchment paper. Score the loaf in the pattern of your choice, add a stencil design if you like, and transfer it to your preheated baking stone.
10. Spritz the loaf with water and bake at 450°F for 10 minutes. Spritz with water 2 more times at 30-second intervals, then lower the temperature to 400°F. and continue baking for an additional 20 minutes.
11. Let the loaf cool down for at least half an hour before slicing and eating.
Notes
The formula for this winey loaf was translated from this forum (http://homopistorius.livejournal.com/1029.html) where the chemics of wine and bread baking are discussed.

My notes:

I used for final dough 320g og bread flour and 37g og Riesling flour.

I bake in Dutch oven since it’s the only way not to burn crust in my horrible oven.

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I’m getting the wine flours from FingerLakesWineFlour on etsy.com

Sourdough Bread with Merlot and Cabernet grapes flour

I can’t believe that another year has passed and it’s again October 16th. That means people all around the world are baking bread. I have started submitting my breads in 2009. Or 2010… I don’t even remember when exactly but it became the tradition. The rules are simple: you bake on October 16th and submit your result to Zorra.
World Bread Day, October 16, 2018
In the love of the bread baking and for  World Baking Day I made this year two sourdough loaves but one came out not so perfect and I wouldn’t show it. Another is also not perfect but at least worth talking about it. Because it’s made with wine flour!

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However don’t get too excited. You will get only smell and a little bit more sour and rich taste than usual sourdough but no booze. And of course benefits of using the grapes flour: antioxidants and vitamins. Well, I hope so…))

Why I made it then? Because it’s fun and challenge! Even a small amount of wine flour changes structure and behavior of the dough. And it’s interesting to make something that different in color from traditional wheat or rye. And it is TASTY! I smell a hint of chocolate. This bread is very delicious with cheese, especially blue cheese.
The recipes for two breads below are very similar in ingredients and methods.  The small difference is in quantity of the wine flour. I found out that you need a little bit bigger amount of Cabernet flour to achieve the rich and beautiful color.

Cabernet Grapes Flour Bread

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Ingredients for one loaf

For the levain:
30 grams active 100 percent hydration starter
54 grams bread flour
6 grams rye whole flour
60grams water @76-78°F (24-25°C)

For the Final Dough:

240 grams of bread flour
60 grams Cabernet grapes flour
240 grams warm water
60 grams of the levain
6 grams salt
Some rice flour for dusting

Instructions
– In the morning prepare your levain by mixing the starter, water,  bread and rye flours. Cover with a plastic wrap, and let it sit for 6 hours in a warm spot. Desired room temperature is 74-78°F (23-25.5°C).
– One hour prior mixing the dough, mix by hand the bread and Cabernet grape flours with water and let this mixture stay in a warm spot in your kitchen for about 60 minutes.
– Add 60 grams of the levain to the flour mixture and mix them till levain incorporates well into the dough.
– Let dough stay for 30 minutes and perform stretches and folds of the dough over itself. Cover and let it rest in a warm spot for 30 minutes.
– Sprinkle the salt over the dough. Mix it by hand, pinching the dough to dissolve the salt, and stretching and folding the dough over itself. Cover and let it rest in a warm spot for 30 minutes.

– Perform lamination*: sprinkle your working surface with some water and stretch the dough into rectangular. The dough thickness should be approximately 1/8 inch. Fold 1/3 of the dough to the center and cover it with the remaining third. Roll it into a ball starting from the top. Cover and let it rest in a warm spot for 30 minutes.

– Perform stretching and folding  four times with a wet hand every 30 minutes. Then cover the dough and let it rise for 90 minutes untouched.

-Shape the dough into a boule by gently folding the dough over itself from all “sides”. Flip the shaped dough over so that the seam side is on the counter. Using a bench scraper, draw the loaf toward you, and then away from you, to tighten up the top of the dough. Cover the boule with a towel and let it rest for 15 minutes. In the meantime, dust a banneton or towel lined bowl with a rice flour.

– After 15 minutes, flip the dough over and reshape the loaf one more time. Place the shaped dough into the banneton seam side up.  Cover with an oiled plastic wrap.

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– Place the shaped loaf in the refrigerator for up to 12 hours (or you can let the dough rise for 90 minutes more and bake the same day).
– About 30 minutes before baking, place a Dutch oven in the oven and preheat it to 500°F(260°C). Remove your loaf from the refrigerator.

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– When ready to bake, pull the Dutch oven out of your oven and transfer the loaf to the hot pan. Carefully return the hot lid to the pan, and place it in the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 450°F(232°C).
– Bake for 10 minutes @500°F (260°C), lower the temperature and bake for 20 minutes @450°F (232°C), remove the lid and bake for approximately 10 minutes more until the crust is deep brown.

– Cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

Serve with cheese and wine or with butter and jam.

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P.S. For Merlo grapes flour bread proportions are: 270 grams bread flour per 30 grams Merlo flour. The rest of the ingredients and method are the same.

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*at this stage you could add chopped dried fruits and nuts. Below is 50g of walnuts and 50g of dried blueberries

 

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I’m getting the wine flours from FingerLakesWineFlour on etsy.com

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