RHEINBROT – My Choice for July bake with BBB

For July bake I had quite a few options but have chosen this recipe because of Riesling. Well, if you know me, you know that I cook with wine, I bake with wine, I bake with wine flour as well. Here was a perfect opportunity to try a new recipe and also use Riesling flour I have on hands. I based my dough on Cathy’s numbers, just added a little bit of wine flour. As usually, wine flour changes the crumb color and gives additional sourness to sourdough, as well as rich and complex taste. It’s particularly great grilled and eaten warm with butter.
Below is copy of Cathy’e recipe and my notes at the end.

Rheinbrot – A Taste of July with the BBB

DSC_3230
Rheinbrot is made with an overnight sponge of Reisling, sourdough, flour and water. This version includes spelt and emmer in the final dough.
Author: Bread Experience
Recipe type: Sourdough Loaf
Cuisine: Bread
Serves: 1 Medium Loaf
Ingredients
Sponge:
72 grams sweet Riesling (or other white wine of your choice)
72 grams boiled water, at room temperature
143 grams white bread flour
72 grams sourdough at 100% hydration
Dough:
207 grams white bread flour
95 grams whole grain spelt flour
55 grams whole grain emmer flour
190 – 225 grams water, divided
8 grams salt
Instructions
1. Mix wine with water and add the sourdough, whisk thoroughly. Add flour and mix again.
2. The dough ferments at 2 stages:
3 hours at a temperature 70-75°F, it should grow at least twice its size, will be lumpy looking at this stage and have larger and smaller bubbles.
3. Pour the sponge in a bowl and whisk thoroughly to remove all the gas out of it and fill it with oxygen. Cover and let sit for 10-12 hours (overnight) at room temperature. Dough will rise again in half and very often shows smaller bubbles.
4. Now the sponge is ready for kneading: pour in the water and stir until smooth. Add the flour, mix well and give the autolysis a chance to do it’s magic for 40-50 minutes. I added more water due to the whole grains, but depending on the type of flour used, you may not need additional water.
5. Add the salt and quickly knead the dough, if it is too sticky add a little four, but be careful not to add too much. You may also need to add a little bit of water to dissolve the salt.
6. Let ferment for 2-2.5 hours. Fold twice after 1 hour and 1½ hour.
7. Form a loaf and let proof in a basket for 1½ hours (until doubled in size) covered with a towel in a draft free place.
8. Preheat oven to 450°F with a baking stone on the middle rack.
9. Gently flip the loaf over to a piece of parchment paper. Score the loaf in the pattern of your choice, add a stencil design if you like, and transfer it to your preheated baking stone.
10. Spritz the loaf with water and bake at 450°F for 10 minutes. Spritz with water 2 more times at 30-second intervals, then lower the temperature to 400°F. and continue baking for an additional 20 minutes.
11. Let the loaf cool down for at least half an hour before slicing and eating.
Notes
The formula for this winey loaf was translated from this forum (http://homopistorius.livejournal.com/1029.html) where the chemics of wine and bread baking are discussed.

My notes:

I used for final dough 320g og bread flour and 37g og Riesling flour.

I bake in Dutch oven since it’s the only way not to burn crust in my horrible oven.

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I’m getting the wine flours from FingerLakesWineFlour on etsy.com

8 thoughts on “RHEINBROT – My Choice for July bake with BBB

Add yours

  1. Wow, fantastic color and crumb, and beautiful bien cuit finish on your crust. Perfection! Thanks so much for baking with us! And now I am going to go read more about wine flours…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yuh, I bought a few types of wine flour and bake with it bread and cookies. Bread I have posted here but never wrote about cookies. It’s just fun for me to experement with different types of flour.

      Like

  2. What beautiful bread! You have reminded me that I really must make Rheinbrot again. I’m wonder if we can get Riesling flour here – I’ve heard of eau-de-vie being made from graped skins and seeds but had no idea they were also used to make flour!

    Many thanks for baking with us!

    (Please excuse if this a duplicate reply. I tried commenting several hours ago as well as now – clearly, I am challenged with logging in.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Elizabeth, yes, this is a wonderful recipe! I would deffinately bake it again. I think that addition of the wine flour gives this bread the rich aroma and beautiful deep color.

      Like

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